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Elsa Sahal - Female Factory
11.09.–13.11.21
SETAREH Berlin is pleased to present the first solo show by Parisian artist Elsa Sahal in Germany.

Dive into Female Factory, where the clay and the flesh, the body and the ceramics become one. Sensual, obscene, bordering on the grotesque, the substance flows like lava, constantly redefined by a logic of its own. Elsa Sahal approaches the history of the sculpture, erectile because essentially male, with the gauge of feminism guided by the principles of horizontality and chaos. The nauseating malleability of bodies becomes the wellspring of new fluid corporeality: emancipated from any standard, crossed by the incandescence of their desires and the permanent excitement of an elsewhere.

Elsa Sahal
Aliénor, 2015
glazed ceramic
98 x 36 x 34 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Trukula Baubo, 2015
glazed ceramic
37 x 30 x 20 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Trukula Baubo, 2021
bronze
37 x 30 x 20 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Isadora, 2021
bronze
33 x 25 x 42 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Dancing Twins, 2021
glazed ceramic
300 x 290 x 40 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Versatile Bella Shy, 2021
glazed ceramic
37 x 30 x 20 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Molly Bloom, 2015
glazed ceramic
35 x 35 x 25 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Danaé, 2021
bronze
35 x 48 x 23 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Pale Purple Fangina, 2021
glazed ceramic
37 x 30 x 20 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Grotte généalogique, 2006
glazed ceramic
127 x 96 x 48 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Whispering hands, 2021
ceramic
77 x 85 x 85 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Alchemist’s Daughter n°4, 2018
glazed ceramic and glass
71 x 65 x 115 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Grand Futuriste, 2003
glazed ceramic
60 x 100 x 40 cm
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Elsa Sahal
Fontaine, 2012
glazed ceramic, hydraulic system
204 x 57 x 42 cm
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While Elsa Sahal may be re-enacting the act of creation, her work is in no way governed by some spiritualizing intent preoccupied with a quest for sanctified origins. In fact, by using ceramics—this domestic art form largely ignored by the history of art—Elsa Sahal prosaically reconnects with the wretched, earthly and feminine face of the human condition, while disassociating herself from a representation of man as a spiritual being and the cause of an array of toxic oppressions—social, environmental, racial, and gender- based—since the Enlightenment.