MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

William Nelson Copley

William Nelson Copley

William Nelson Copley

William Nelson Copley

William Nelson Copley

SETAREH is pleased to present Masterpiece, an exclusive platform displaying a range of art works inbetween contemporary, emerging and Post-War artists.

This Viewing Room highlights the Masterpiece JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) by artist William N. Copley, an American painter, who was also known as CPLY.

SETAREH is pleased to present Masterpiece, an exclusive platform displaying a range of art works inbetween contemporary, emerging and Post-War artists.

This Viewing Room highlights the Masterpiece JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) by artist William N. Copley, an American painter, who was also known as CPLY.

SETAREH is pleased to present Masterpiece, an exclusive platform displaying a range of art works inbetween contemporary, emerging and Post-War artists.

This Viewing Room highlights the Masterpiece JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) by artist William N. Copley, an American painter, who was also known as CPLY.

SETAREH is pleased to present Masterpiece, an exclusive platform displaying a range of art works inbetween contemporary, emerging and Post-War artists.

This Viewing Room highlights the Masterpiece JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) by artist William N. Copley, an American painter, who was also known as CPLY.

SETAREH is pleased to present Masterpiece, an exclusive platform displaying a range of art works inbetween contemporary, emerging and Post-War artists.

This Viewing Room highlights the Masterpiece JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) by artist William N. Copley, an American painter, who was also known as CPLY.

1975_William-Nelson-Copley-July-5-Great-Day-Coming_166x133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

“Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.“

“Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.“

“Show me a work of
art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.“

“Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.“

“Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.“

Bold, capitalized and filled with white stars, the red letters and the number 5 stand out from a vibrant blue background. On a closer look, the viewer discovers tiny firecrackers hovering across the canvas. Copleys’ oeuvre is whimsical and joyful. July 5 (Great Day Coming) is another great example of the ribald and wry humour that the artist pursued throughout his life. As observed by Anne Doran: "For [Copley], the worst crime was to be humorless and not living fully was a close runner-up. He was funny, outrageous, and honest, and he used everything in his art. He once wrote to me, ‘Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.’ " (A. Doran, in A. Atlas, eds. William N. Copley. Selected Writings, New York 2020, 171). 

Copley refers to social-cultural and political developments in the United States of America with a visionary approach. In the light of the country’s Independence Day, on 4th of July, the promise of a united nation "Great Day Coming", today more than ever, awaits its fulfillment in the future.

Bold, capitalized and filled with white stars, the red letters and the number 5 stand out from a vibrant blue background. On a closer look, the viewer discovers tiny firecrackers hovering across the canvas. Copleys’ oeuvre is whimsical and joyful. July 5 (Great Day Coming) is another great example of the ribald and wry humour that the artist pursued throughout his life. As observed by Anne Doran: "For [Copley], the worst crime was to be humorless and not living fully was a close runner-up. He was funny, outrageous, and honest, and he used everything in his art. He once wrote to me, ‘Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.’ " (A. Doran, in A. Atlas, eds. William N. Copley. Selected Writings, New York 2020, 171) 

Copley refers to social-cultural and political developments in the United States of America with a visionary approach. In the light of the country’s Independence Day, on 4th of July, the promise of a united nation "Great Day Coming", today more than ever, awaits its fulfillment in the future. 

Bold, capitalized and filled with white stars, the red letters and the number 5 stand out from a vibrant blue background. On a closer look, the viewer discovers tiny firecrackers hovering across the canvas. Copleys’ oeuvre is whimsical and joyful. July 5 (Great Day Coming) is another great example of the ribald and wry humour that the artist pursued throughout his life. As observed by Anne Doran: "For [Copley], the worst crime was to be humorless and not living fully was a close runner-up. He was funny, outrageous, and honest, and he used everything in his art. He once wrote to me, ‘Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.’ " (A. Doran, in A. Atlas, eds. William N. Copley. Selected Writings, New York 2020, 171).

Copley refers to social-cultural and political developments in the United States of America with a visionary approach. In the light of the country’s Independence Day, on 4th of July, the promise of a united nation "Great Day Coming", today more than ever, awaits its fulfillment in the future. 

Bold, capitalized and filled with white stars, the red letters and the number 5 stand out from a vibrant blue background. On a closer look, the viewer discovers tiny firecrackers hovering across the canvas. Copleys’ oeuvre is whimsical and joyful. July 5 (Great Day Coming) is another great example of the ribald and wry humour that the artist pursued throughout his life. As observed by Anne Doran: "For [Copley], the worst crime was to be humorless and not living fully was a close runner-up. He was funny, outrageous, and honest, and he used everything in his art. He once wrote to me, ‘Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.’ " (A. Doran, in A. Atlas, eds. William N. Copley. Selected Writings, New York 2020, 171).

Copley refers to social-cultural and political developments in the United States of America with a visionary approach. In the light of the country’s Independence Day, on 4th of July, the promise of a united nation "Great Day Coming", today more than ever, awaits its fulfillment in the future. 

Bold, capitalized and filled with white stars, the red letters and the number 5 stand out from a vibrant blue background. On a closer look, the viewer discovers tiny firecrackers hovering across the canvas. Copleys’ oeuvre is whimsical and joyful. July 5 (Great Day Coming) is another great example of the ribald and wry humour that the artist pursued throughout his life. As observed by Anne Doran: "For [Copley], the worst crime was to be humorless and not living fully was a close runner-up. He was funny, outrageous, and honest, and he used everything in his art. He once wrote to me, ‘Show me a work of art that is not autobiographical and I’ll show you virgin birth.’ " (A. Doran, in A. Atlas, eds. William N. Copley. Selected Writings, New York 2020, 171).

Copley refers to social-cultural and political developments in the United States of America with a visionary approach. In the light of the country’s Independence Day, on 4th of July, the promise of a united nation "Great Day Coming", today more than ever, awaits its fulfillment in the future. 

William Nelson Copley, 1975, JULY 5 (Great Day Coming), Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas, 166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

William Nelson Copley
JULY 5 (Great Day Coming) 
1975
Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas
166 x 133 cm

WILLIAM COPLEY – Katalog – Baden-Baden, 2012, Stiftung Frieder Burda und Götz Adriani

WILLIAM COPLEY - Katalog - Baden-Baden, 2012,
Stiftung Frieder Burda und Götz Adriani

WILLIAM COPLEY - Katalog - Baden-Baden, 2012,
Stiftung Frieder Burda und Götz Adriani

WILLIAM COPLEY - Katalog - Baden-Baden, 2012, Stiftung Frieder Burda und Götz Adriani

WILLIAM COPLEY - Katalog - Baden-Baden, 2012, Stiftung Frieder Burda und Götz Adriani

WILLIAM COPLEY - Katalog - Baden-Baden, 2012, Stiftung Frieder Burda und Götz Adriani

Although at first glance, the following work takes on stately pop-art characteristics and is strongly reminiscent of works such as Ed Ruscha's Hurting the Word Radio #2 (1964) orRoy Lichtenstein’s Whaam!;the artist does not use commercial techniques and images from popular culture. Instead, the present work unfolds the political and poetic dimensions of the artist's life. July 5 (Great Day Coming) was likely inspired by personal and narrative touches rather than by his contemporaries. Despite Copley's commitment to Surrealism, his friendship with its artists and the influences of the flourishing Pop Art scene of New York in the 1970s, his artistic process did not fit neatly within either category. As the esteemed art historian Roland Penrose observes, it is impossible to place Copley in any ''school''. Participating in World War II had shattered Copley’s life and after returning to California in 1945, he divested any convictions about the direction his future should follow. While Copley increasingly distanced himself from his conservative family, with whose point of view he could no longer identify –especially after his wartime experiences–, he became a supporter of left-liberal politics, attended political meetings and distributed pamphlets of the Progressive Party around Henry A. Wallace. His son Bill Copley commented: "It was the bicentennial in honour of America's 200th year. […] Patriotism to him was a very broad subject and included everything about America, including the kitchen sink. [...] Politics and satire were always a big part of his work. And sex, of course" (B. Copley, quoted in 'Billy Copley & Vincent Fremont 2012', in The Patriotism of CPLY, exh.cat., New York: Paul Kasmin Gallery, 2012, n.p.). As the artist himself states: ''Surrealism made everything understandable: my genteel family, the war, and why I attended the Yale Prom without my shoes. It looked like something I might succeed at.'' (William N. Copley, 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dealer' 1974, p. 5).

[...]

Although at first glance, the following work takes on stately pop-art characteristics and is strongly reminiscent of works such as Ed Ruscha's Hurting the Word Radio #2 (1964) orRoy Lichtenstein’s Whaam!;the artist does not use commercial techniques and images from popular culture. Instead, the present work unfolds the political and poetic dimensions of the artist's life. July 5 (Great Day Coming) was likely inspired by personal and narrative touches rather than by his contemporaries. Despite Copley's commitment to Surrealism, his friendship with its artists and the influences of the flourishing Pop Art scene of New York in the 1970s, his artistic process did not fit neatly within either category. As the esteemed art historian Roland Penrose observes, it is impossible to place Copley in any ''school''. Participating in World War II had shattered Copley’s life and after returning to California in 1945, he divested any convictions about the direction his future should follow. While Copley increasingly distanced himself from his conservative family, with whose point of view he could no longer identify –especially after his wartime experiences–, he became a supporter of left-liberal politics, attended political meetings and distributed pamphlets of the Progressive Party around Henry A. Wallace. His son Bill Copley commented: "It was the bicentennial in honour of America's 200th year. […] Patriotism to him was a very broad subject and included everything about America, including the kitchen sink. [...] Politics and satire were always a big part of his work. And sex, of course" (B. Copley, quoted in 'Billy Copley & Vincent Fremont 2012', in The Patriotism of CPLY, exh.cat., New York: Paul Kasmin Gallery, 2012, n.p.). As the artist himself states: ''Surrealism made everything understandable: my genteel family, the war, and why I attended the Yale Prom without my shoes. It looked like something I might succeed at.'' (William N. Copley, 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dealer' 1974, p. 5).

[...]

Although at first glance, the following work takes on stately pop-art characteristics and is strongly reminiscent of works such as Ed Ruscha's Hurting the Word Radio #2 (1964) or Roy Lichtenstein’s Whaam!; the artist does not use commercial techniques and images from popular culture, instead the present work unfolds the political and poetic dimensions of the artist's life. July 5 (Great Day Coming) was likely more specifically inspired by personal and narrative touches rather than that of his contemporaries. Despite Copley's commitment to Surrealism and his friendship with its artists, and despite the influences of the flourishing Pop Art scene of New York in the 1970s, his artistic process did not fit neatly within either category. As the esteemed art historian Roland Penrose observes, it is impossible to place Copley in any ''school''. Participating in World War II had shattered Copley’s world and after returning to California in 1945 divested of any convictions about the direction his future should take. While Copley increasingly distanced himself from his conservative family, with whose world views he could no longer identify - especially after his wartime experiences - he became a supporter of left-liberal politics, attended political meetings and distributed pamphlets of the Progressive Party around Henry A. Wallace. His son Bill Copley commented: "It was the bicentennial in honour of America's 200th year. […] Patriotism to him was a very broad subject and included everything about America, including the kitchen sink. [...] Politics and satire were always a big part of his work. And sex, of course" (B. Copley, quoted in 'Billy Copley & Vincent Fremont 2012', in The Patriotism of CPLY, exh.cat., New York: Paul Kasmin Gallery, 2012, n.p.). As the artist himself states: ''Surrealism made everything understandable: my genteel family, the war, and why I attended the Yale Prom without my shoes. It looked like something I might succeed at.'' (William N. Copley, 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dealer' 1974, p. 5).

[...]

Although at first glance, the following work takes on stately pop-art characteristics and is strongly reminiscent of works such as Ed Ruscha's Hurting the Word Radio #2 (1964) or Roy Lichtenstein’s Whaam!; the artist does not use commercial techniques and images from popular culture, instead the present work unfolds the political and poetic dimensions of the artist's life. July 5 (Great Day Coming) was likely more specifically inspired by personal and narrative touches rather than that of his contemporaries. Despite Copley's commitment to Surrealism and his friendship with its artists, and despite the influences of the flourishing Pop Art scene of New York in the 1970s, his artistic process did not fit neatly within either category. As the esteemed art historian Roland Penrose observes, it is impossible to place Copley in any ''school''. Participating in World War II had shattered Copley’s world and after returning to California in 1945 divested of any convictions about the direction his future should take. While Copley increasingly distanced himself from his conservative family, with whose world views he could no longer identify - especially after his wartime experiences - he became a supporter of left-liberal politics, attended political meetings and distributed pamphlets of the Progressive Party around Henry A. Wallace. His son Bill Copley commented: "It was the bicentennial in honour of America's 200th year. […] Patriotism to him was a very broad subject and included everything about America, including the kitchen sink. [...] Politics and satire were always a big part of his work. And sex, of course" (B. Copley, quoted in 'Billy Copley & Vincent Fremont 2012', in The Patriotism of CPLY, exh.cat., New York: Paul Kasmin Gallery, 2012, n.p.). As the artist himself states: ''Surrealism made everything understandable: my genteel family, the war, and why I attended the Yale Prom without my shoes. It looked like something I might succeed at.'' (William N. Copley, 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dealer' 1974, p. 5).

[...]

Although at first glance, the following work takes on stately pop-art characteristics and is strongly reminiscent of works such as Ed Ruscha's Hurting the Word Radio #2 (1964) or Roy Lichtenstein’s Whaam!; the artist does not use commercial techniques and images from popular culture, instead the present work unfolds the political and poetic dimensions of the artist's life. July 5 (Great Day Coming) was likely more specifically inspired by personal and narrative touches rather than that of his contemporaries. Despite Copley's commitment to Surrealism and his friendship with its artists, and despite the influences of the flourishing Pop Art scene of New York in the 1970s, his artistic process did not fit neatly within either category. As the esteemed art historian Roland Penrose observes, it is impossible to place Copley in any ''school''. Participating in World War II had shattered Copley’s world and after returning to California in 1945 divested of any convictions about the direction his future should take. While Copley increasingly distanced himself from his conservative family, with whose world views he could no longer identify - especially after his wartime experiences - he became a supporter of left-liberal politics, attended political meetings and distributed pamphlets of the Progressive Party around Henry A. Wallace. His son Bill Copley commented: "It was the bicentennial in honour of America's 200th year. […] Patriotism to him was a very broad subject and included everything about America, including the kitchen sink. [...] Politics and satire were always a big part of his work. And sex, of course" (B. Copley, quoted in 'Billy Copley & Vincent Fremont 2012', in The Patriotism of CPLY, exh.cat., New York: Paul Kasmin Gallery, 2012, n.p.). As the artist himself states: ''Surrealism made everything understandable: my genteel family, the war, and why I attended the Yale Prom without my shoes. It looked like something I might succeed at.'' (William N. Copley, 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dealer' 1974, p. 5).

[...]

William Nelson Copley, 1975, JULY 5 (Great Day Coming), Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas, 166 x 133 cm
William Nelson Copley, 1975, JULY 5 (Great Day Coming), Acryl with fireworks, collaged on canvas, 166 x 133 cm
Copley2

Man Ray, Juliet Ray, William Copley and Marcel Duchamp on board the SS de Grasse on March 12, 1951 before their departure from New York to Paris

Man Ray, Juliet Ray, William Copley and Marcel Duchamp on board the SS de Grasse on March 12, 1951 before their departure from New York to Paris

Man Ray, Juliet Ray, William Copley and Marcel Duchamp on board the SS de Grasse on March 12, 1951 before their departure from New York to Paris

Man Ray, Juliet Ray, William Copley and Marcel Duchamp on board the SS de Grasse on March 12, 1951 before their departure from New York to Paris

Man Ray, Juliet Ray, William Copley and Marcel Duchamp on board the SS de Grasse on March 12, 1951 before their departure from New York to Paris

Created in 1975, at the zenith of William Copley’s (1919 - 1996) artistic career, July 5 (Great Day Coming) denotes Copley‘s masterful return to the New York contemporary art scene – after living abroad in France for thirteen years.

Prior to becoming an artist, Copley pursued the path to be a collector, art patron and gallerist, as well as a notable writer. He was introduced to art and, in particular, to Surrealism by his brother-in-law. Together, they opened the ‘’Copley Gallery’’ in Beverly Hills in 1947. Although the success of the gallery was rather modest, this event heralded a pivotal milestone in Copley’s life. It established the foundation of his enduring successful career as an artist. During the six months that the gallery was open, works by René Magritte, Yves Tanguy, and Man Ray were exhibited. Through the sincere friendship he shared with Man Ray, he acquainted Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst, with whom a prosperous and artistic exchange aroused.

Executed in 1975, at the zenith of William Copley’s (1919 - 1996) artistic career, July 5 (Great Day Coming) highlights Copley‘s masterful return to the New York contemporary art scene - after living abroad in France for thirteen years.

Prior to the advent of becoming an artist Copley pursued a path as a notable writer, collector, art patron and gallerist. He was introduced to art and in particular, Surrealism by his brother-in-law, with whom he opened the ‘’Copley Gallery’’ in Beverly Hills in 1947. Although the success of the gallery was rather modest, this event heralds a pivotal milestone in Copley’s life and establishes the foundation of his enduring successful career as an artist. During the six months opening of the gallery, works by René Magritte, Yves Tanguy, and Man Ray were exhibi- ted. Through the sincere friendship with Man Ray, he met Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, with whom a prosperous and artistic exchange arouse.

Created in 1975, at the zenith of William Copley’s (1919 - 1996) artistic career, July 5 (Great Day Coming) denotes Copley‘s masterful return to the New York contemporary art scene – after living abroad in France for thirteen years.

Prior to becoming an artist, Copley pursued the path to be a collector, art patron and gallerist, as well as a notable writer. He was introduced to art and, in particular, to Surrealism by his brother-in-law. Together, they opened the ‘’Copley Gallery’’ in Beverly Hills in 1947. Although the success of the gallery was rather modest, this event heralded a pivotal milestone in Copley’s life. It established the foundation of his enduring successful career as an artist. During the six months that the gallery was open, works by René Magritte, Yves Tanguy, and Man Ray were exhibited. Through the sincere friendship he shared with Man Ray, he acquainted Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst, with whom a prosperous and artistic exchange aroused.

Executed in 1975, at the zenith of William Copley’s (1919 - 1996) artistic career, July 5 (Great Day Coming) highlights Copley‘s masterful return to the New York contemporary art scene - after living abroad in France for thirteen years.

Prior to the advent of becoming an artist Copley pursued a path as a notable writer, collector, art patron and gallerist. He was introduced to art and in particular, Surrealism by his brother-in-law, with whom he opened the ‘’Copley Gallery’’ in Beverly Hills in 1947. Although the success of the gallery was rather modest, this event heralds a pivotal milestone in Copley’s life and establishes the foundation of his enduring successful career as an artist. During the six months opening of the gallery, works by René Magritte, Yves Tanguy, and Man Ray were exhibi- ted. Through the sincere friendship with Man Ray, he met Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, with whom a prosperous and artistic exchange arouse.

Executed in 1975, at the zenith of William Copley’s (1919 - 1996) artistic career, July 5 (Great Day Coming) highlights Copley‘s masterful return to the New York contemporary art scene - after living abroad in France for thirteen years.

Prior to the advent of becoming an artist Copley pursued a path as a notable writer, collector, art patron and gallerist. He was introduced to art and in particular, Surrealism by his brother-in-law, with whom he opened the ‘’Copley Gallery’’ in Beverly Hills in 1947. Although the success of the gallery was rather modest, this event heralds a pivotal milestone in Copley’s life and establishes the foundation of his enduring successful career as an artist. During the six months opening of the gallery, works by René Magritte, Yves Tanguy, and Man Ray were exhibi- ted. Through the sincere friendship with Man Ray, he met Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, with whom a prosperous and artistic exchange arouse.

Learn more about William Nelson Copley and

Learn more about William Nelson Copley and

Learn more about William Nelson Copley and

Learn more about William Nelson Copley and

Learn more about William Nelson Copley and