MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

Viewing Room

WALTER LEBLANC 

WALTER LEBLANC 

WALTER LEBLANC 

WALTER LEBLANC 

WALTER LEBLANC 

This Viewing Room invites you to discover Twisted strings, a masterpiece by Walter Leblanc, which was exhibited in the 35th BIENNALE 1970 in Venice, Italy. SETAREH is pleased to present 'Masterpiece', an online series that highlights artworks by established modern artists. Take the chance to learn more about the techniques and context of some of the most representative cultural expressions of contemporary art.

This Viewing Room invites you to discover Twisted strings, a masterpiece by Walter Leblanc, which was exhibited in the 35th BIENNALE 1970 in Venice, Italy. SETAREH is pleased to present 'Masterpiece', an online series that highlights artworks by established modern artists. Take the chance to learn more about the techniques and context of some of the most representative cultural expressions of contemporary art.

This Viewing Room invites you to discover Twisted strings, a masterpiece by Walter Leblanc, which was exhibited in the 35th BIENNALE 1970 in Venice, Italy. SETAREH is pleased to present 'Masterpiece', an online series that highlights artworks by established modern artists. Take the chance to learn more about the techniques and context of some of the most representative cultural expressions of contemporary art.

This Viewing Room invites you to discover Twisted strings, a masterpiece by Walter Leblanc, which was exhibited in the 35th BIENNALE 1970 in Venice, Italy. SETAREH is pleased to present 'Masterpiece', an online series that highlights artworks by established modern artists. Take the chance to learn more about the techniques and context of some of the most representative cultural expressions of contemporary art.

This Viewing Room invites you to discover Twisted strings, a masterpiece by Walter Leblanc, which was exhibited in the 35th BIENNALE 1970 in Venice, Italy. SETAREH is pleased to present 'Masterpiece', an online series that highlights artworks by established modern artists. Take the chance to learn more about the techniques and context of some of the most representative cultural expressions of contemporary art.

Setareh_2020_11_02_24587_

Installation View
Walter Leblanc
Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Installation View
Walter Leblanc
Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Installation View
Walter Leblanc
Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Installation View
Walter Leblanc
Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Installation View
Walter Leblanc
Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

"I wanted to paint in a way that had a minimum of drawing (the point) but a maximum of personality and originality." 

"I wanted to paint in a way that had a minimum of drawing (the point) but a maximum of personality and originality." 

"I wanted to paint in a way that had a minimum of drawing (the point) but a maximum of personality and originality." 

"I wanted to paint in a way that had a minimum of drawing (the point) but a maximum of personality and originality." 

"I wanted to paint in a way that had a minimum of drawing (the point) but a maximum of personality and originality." 

Walter-Leblanc_Twisted-strings

Walter Leblanc (1932 – 1986) is an important Belgian figure of European post-war art. Over the years, he has built an extremely coherent oeuvre staging light without artifice or any disrupting elements. Within the international, neo-avant-garde network of the Nouvelle Tendance, ZERO, op art, kinetic art, concrete art and (neo)constructivism, Leblanc gained both national and international recognition.

Walter Leblanc (1932 – 1986) is an important Belgian figure of European post-war art. Over the years, he has built an extremely coherent oeuvre staging light without artifice or any disrupting elements. Within the international, neo-avant-garde network of the Nouvelle Tendance, ZERO, op art, kinetic art, concrete art and (neo)constructivism, Leblanc gained both national and international recognition.

Walter Leblanc (1932 – 1986) is an important Belgian figure of European post-war art. Over the years, he has built an extremely coherent oeuvre staging light without artifice or any disrupting elements. Within the international, neo-avant-garde network of the Nouvelle Tendance, ZERO, op art, kinetic art, concrete art and (neo)constructivism, Leblanc gained both national and international recognition.

Walter Leblanc (1932 – 1986) is an important Belgian figure of European post-war art. Over the years, he has built an extremely coherent oeuvre staging light without artifice or any disrupting elements. Within the international, neo-avant-garde network of the Nouvelle Tendance, ZERO, op art, kinetic art, concrete art and (neo)constructivism, Leblanc gained both national and international recognition.

Walter Leblanc (1932 – 1986) is an important Belgian figure of European post-war art. Over the years, he has built an extremely coherent oeuvre staging light without artifice or any disrupting elements. Within the international, neo-avant-garde network of the Nouvelle Tendance, ZERO, op art, kinetic art, concrete art and (neo)constructivism, Leblanc gained both national and international recognition.

In 1959 Leblanc began to use torsion – a technique of twisting materials – in both his painting and sculpture. He was particularly interested in the ways that light would ripple across the surface of these works, creating dynamic effects. Twisted Strings, 80F X 477 is an early example of this approach. Cotton thread is stitched to the canvas, and covered with black latex paint.

Leblanc was the founder of the Antwerp art collective G58, a group of young artists dedicated to new techniques and materials. 

In 1959 Leblanc began to use torsion – a technique of twisting materials – in both his painting and sculpture. He was particularly interested in the ways that light would ripple across the surface of these works, creating dynamic effects. Twisted Strings, 80F X 477 is an early example of this approach. Cotton thread is stitched to the canvas, and covered with black latex paint.

Leblanc was the founder of the Antwerp art collective G58, a group of young artists dedicated to new techniques and materials. 

In 1959 Leblanc began to use torsion – a technique of twisting materials – in both his painting and sculpture. He was particularly interested in the ways that light would ripple across the surface of these works, creating dynamic effects. Twisted Strings, 80F X 477 is an early example of this approach. Cotton thread is stitched to the canvas, and covered with black latex paint.

Leblanc was the founder of the Antwerp art collective G58, a group of young artists dedicated to new techniques and materials. 

In 1959 Leblanc began to use torsion – a technique of twisting materials – in both his painting and sculpture. He was particularly interested in the ways that light would ripple across the surface of these works, creating dynamic effects. Twisted Strings, 80F X 477 is an early example of this approach. Cotton thread is stitched to the canvas, and covered with black latex paint.

Leblanc was the founder of the Antwerp art collective G58, a group of young artists dedicated to new techniques and materials. 

In 1959 Leblanc began to use torsion – a technique of twisting materials – in both his painting and sculpture. He was particularly interested in the ways that light would ripple across the surface of these works, creating dynamic effects. Twisted Strings, 80F X 477 is an early example of this approach. Cotton thread is stitched to the canvas, and covered with black latex paint.

Leblanc was the founder of the Antwerp art collective G58, a group of young artists dedicated to new techniques and materials. 

Leblanc-Kopieneu

Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

Twisted strings
1970
string on canvas
130 x 108 cm I 51 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.

SETAREH_Walter_Leblanc-(verschoben)

Exhibited: 35th BIENNALE 1970, Venice, Italy

Bildschirmfoto-2021-04-03-um-14.03.53
Bildschirmfoto 2021-04-03 um 14.03.53

Leblanc actively participated in ground-breaking international exhibitions such as Monochrome Malerei (1960, Leverkusen), The Responsive Eye (1965, MoMA, New York) and Serielle Formationen (1967, Frankfurt am Main). In 1964 he won the prestigious Young Belgian Art Prize and in 1970 he took part in the 35th Venice Biennale. From 1977 until his early death in 1986, Leblanc was teaching at the Instituut voor Architectuur en Stedenbouwkunde (NHIBS) in Antwerp.

His work is part of many important museum and private art collections worldwide, such as Centre Pompidou (Paris), Tate Modern (London), Museum Kunst Palast (Düsseldorf) Josef Albers Museum (Bottrop), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), S.M.A.K. (Ghent), Mu.Zee (Ostend) and The Fine Arts Museum (Brussels).

Leblanc actively participated in ground-breaking international exhibitions such as Monochrome Malerei (1960, Leverkusen), The Responsive Eye (1965, MoMA, New York) and Serielle Formationen (1967, Frankfurt am Main). In 1964 he won the prestigious Young Belgian Art Prize and in 1970 he took part in the 35th Venice Biennale. From 1977 until his early death in 1986, Leblanc was teaching at the Instituut voor Architectuur en Stedenbouwkunde (NHIBS) in Antwerp.

His work is part of many important museum and private art collections worldwide, such as Centre Pompidou (Paris), Tate Modern (London), Museum Kunst Palast (Düsseldorf) Josef Albers Museum (Bottrop), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), S.M.A.K. (Ghent), Mu.Zee (Ostend) and The Fine Arts Museum (Brussels).

Leblanc actively participated in ground-breaking international exhibitions such as Monochrome Malerei (1960, Leverkusen), The Responsive Eye (1965, MoMA, New York) and Serielle Formationen (1967, Frankfurt am Main). In 1964 he won the prestigious Young Belgian Art Prize and in 1970 he took part in the 35th Venice Biennale. From 1977 until his early death in 1986, Leblanc was teaching at the Instituut voor Architectuur en Stedenbouwkunde (NHIBS) in Antwerp.

His work is part of many important museum and private art collections worldwide, such as Centre Pompidou (Paris), Tate Modern (London), Museum Kunst Palast (Düsseldorf) Josef Albers Museum (Bottrop), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), S.M.A.K. (Ghent), Mu.Zee (Ostend) and The Fine Arts Museum (Brussels).

Leblanc actively participated in ground-breaking international exhibitions such as Monochrome Malerei (1960, Leverkusen), The Responsive Eye (1965, MoMA, New York) and Serielle Formationen (1967, Frankfurt am Main). In 1964 he won the prestigious Young Belgian Art Prize and in 1970 he took part in the 35th Venice Biennale. From 1977 until his early death in 1986, Leblanc was teaching at the Instituut voor Architectuur en Stedenbouwkunde (NHIBS) in Antwerp.

His work is part of many important museum and private art collections worldwide, such as Centre Pompidou (Paris), Tate Modern (London), Museum Kunst Palast (Düsseldorf) Josef Albers Museum (Bottrop), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), S.M.A.K. (Ghent), Mu.Zee (Ostend) and The Fine Arts Museum (Brussels).

Leblanc actively participated in ground-breaking international exhibitions such as Monochrome Malerei (1960, Leverkusen), The Responsive Eye (1965, MoMA, New York) and Serielle Formationen (1967, Frankfurt am Main). In 1964 he won the prestigious Young Belgian Art Prize and in 1970 he took part in the 35th Venice Biennale. From 1977 until his early death in 1986, Leblanc was teaching at the Instituut voor Architectuur en Stedenbouwkunde (NHIBS) in Antwerp.

His work is part of many important museum and private art collections worldwide, such as Centre Pompidou (Paris), Tate Modern (London), Museum Kunst Palast (Düsseldorf) Josef Albers Museum (Bottrop), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), S.M.A.K. (Ghent), Mu.Zee (Ostend) and The Fine Arts Museum (Brussels).

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